Liquidating a steel building

highlight the manufacturer’s products of clothing, shoes, furnishing goods, hats, caps, notions, etc.,[i] referring to themselves as “jobbers,” a term for wholesale merchants who then sell to retailers. This was the heart of the Race Street shopping district, and the company was the only structure north of Fourth Street used exclusively for wholesale purposes.[ii] With this move, the opportunity was opened for the building to be remodeled and occupied by a department store.[iii] Kline’s, a division of Kline Brothers, moved into the Race Street property in September 1911.[iv] Before the building on the northeast corner of Eighth and Walnut was ready to be occupied, the company closed a lease with the Charles Meiss Shoe Company for a portion of the building.[v] [The Charles Meiss Shoe Company stayed at Eighth and Walnut until 1928.[vi Progress for the new building moved right along as permission was granted in 1910 to the company to wreck a row of three story houses on the site of the expected 9-story building.[vii] Elzner & Anderson were selected as the architects.In February 1910 reported that a new building was to be constructed on the northeast corner of Eighth and Walnut Streets. was located at 421 and 423 Race Street, a structure of 30,000 square feet and owned by the L. Alfred Oscar Elzner opened an office in Cincinnati in early 1887 and was joined by George M. Together, they moved away from late Victorian styling and towards Beaux-Arts methods.

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highlight the manufacturer’s products of clothing, shoes, furnishing goods, hats, caps, notions, etc.,[i] referring to themselves as “jobbers,” a term for wholesale merchants who then sell to retailers. This was the heart of the Race Street shopping district, and the company was the only structure north of Fourth Street used exclusively for wholesale purposes.[ii] With this move, the opportunity was opened for the building to be remodeled and occupied by a department store.[iii] Kline’s, a division of Kline Brothers, moved into the Race Street property in September 1911.[iv] Before the building on the northeast corner of Eighth and Walnut was ready to be occupied, the company closed a lease with the Charles Meiss Shoe Company for a portion of the building.[v] [The Charles Meiss Shoe Company stayed at Eighth and Walnut until 1928.[vi]] Progress for the new building moved right along as permission was granted in 1910 to the company to wreck a row of three story houses on the site of the expected 9-story building.[vii] Elzner & Anderson were selected as the architects.

In February 1910 reported that a new building was to be constructed on the northeast corner of Eighth and Walnut Streets. was located at 421 and 423 Race Street, a structure of 30,000 square feet and owned by the L. Alfred Oscar Elzner opened an office in Cincinnati in early 1887 and was joined by George M. Together, they moved away from late Victorian styling and towards Beaux-Arts methods.

Andrew pursues known and unknown assets in remnant deals; negotiates, reconciles, and objects to claims; litigates preference demands; and manages out-of-court assignments, for the benefit of creditors.

Eighth Street, Cincinnati, begins before the building was constructed in 1911.

Although the dry good wholesale business left the building in 1929, it retained the name of the Faller Building.

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building under construction.[x] A 1910 report from the Commissioner of Buildings Office conveyed that the construction costs were estimated at 5,000. for an alleged infringement of a patented improvement in concrete construction that was being used.[xii] One year later, Judge Howard Clark Hollister sustained the demurrer (objection) of the defendants, holding that “Patent No. Nolte on July 5, 1907 for concrete floor construction ‘is wholly void upon its face for want to patentable innovation and novelty,’ as alleged in the demurrer.”[xiii] However, the case went to the United States Circuit Court of Appeals which determined that the validity of the patent was held.

The builder and first owner, The Isaac Faller’s Sons Co., was founded in 1868.

At that time the company was simply called “Isaac Faller.” By 1876 it was “Isaac Faller & Co.” “Sons” was added to the title by 1886.

The article emphasized that estimated and actual costs are two very different numbers, especially as this figure was given for a building that was not yet complete.[xi] Legal drama came into play when the Ferro Concrete Construction Co. The Isaac Faller’s Sons Company was “perpetually enjoined from further infringement” and the Concrete Steel Company secured a license to use the patented process.

The defendants paid the complainant’s court costs.[xiv] Construction was started mid-May 1910 and the Isaac Faller’s Sons Co.

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